Rebecca Walker (1969 - ): Photo by David Fenton and Courtesy of Rebecca Walker Jennifer Baumgardner (c. 1970 - ): Photo by Ali Price and courtesy of Jennifer Baumgardner Maxine Hong Kingston (1940 - ):  Photo Courtesy of ? Margaret Sanger (1879 - 1966)Trinh T. Minh-ha (1952 - ): Courtesy of UC Berkeley Virginia Woolf (1882 - 1941)  
Toni Morrison (1931 - ): Photo Courtesy of ?

 

 

 

Simone de Beauvoir (1908 - 1986)

Susan Faludi (1956 - ): Courtesy of ?

 
  dot
dot

      The Women's Studies Program at Monmouth College

dot
dot
dot
  Home
  The Faculty
  The Minor
  The F Word series
  Events
  Resources
  WOST courses
  ► CWA
  PRISM
  WOST reading list
  New WOST books
  Contact us

 

Contact information:

 

Dr. Marlo Belschner

700 East Broadway

Monmouth, IL 61462

(309) 457-2377

mmb@monm.edu

 

 

 

 

Women's Studies Courses

Go to Spring 2009 Spring 2008 Fall 2007

Cross listing a WOST course

Fall 2008 

 

WOST 201: Introduction to Women’s Studies
An introduction to Western feminist thought and the study of women’s roles and status in society. This course also evaluates present knowledge about women, questions stereotypes, and reinforces the value and content of women’s everyday lives. (Three credits.) (Peterson)

CATA 231: Interpersonal Communication
An examination of the verbal and nonverbal features of face-to-face communication in everyday life, social interaction, professional activity, and in our culture as a whole. Attention is given to language as a cultural system and as a meaning system, communication as behavior, relationship development, and communication systems and effects. Emphasis is placed on understanding theory, systematically observing communicative behavior, analysis of communication situations, and skill improvement. Offered each year. Prerequisite: COMM 101. (Three credits.) (Peterson)

 

Spring 2009


WOST 201: Introduction to Women’s Studies
An introduction to Western feminist thought and the study of women’s roles and status in society. This course also evaluates present knowledge about women, questions stereotypes, and reinforces the value and content of women’s everyday lives. (Three credits.) (Mamary)

ANTH 250: Children in Cross-Cultural Perspectives
(Kuppinger) (3 credits)

ENGL 350: British Women Novelists of the 19th Century
Why did women writers come of age during the 19th-century and land wide audiences? Why did some women novelists embrace patriarchy while others challenged it? Why did some women writers focus on marriage plots, but others broke into "men's subjects" such as violent crime, politics and industry? These are just a few of the questions we'll explore in this course. We'll examine novelists such as Jane Austen, Charlotte Bronte, George Eliot, Mary Elizabeth Braddon, and Elizabeth Gaskell using formal, historical, and psychoanalytic approaches to understand the work, the writers, and the women of the period better. (3 credits) (Hale)

CLAS 230: Women in Myth
(Sienkewicz) (3 credits)

 

Spring 2008

WOST 201G. Introduction to Women’s Studies. An introduction to Western feminist thought and the study of women’s roles and status in society. This course also evaluates present knowledge about women, questions stereotypes, and reinforces the value and content of women’s everyday lives. (Three credits.) (Belschner)

ANTH 362. Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective. An exploration of themes and questions of gender as defined and experienced in different cultural contexts. Central to the course is the analysis of the cultural construction of gender. (Three credits.) (Kuppinger)

CLAS 240G/ HIST 240. Ancient Society: Women and Gender in the Greco-Roman World. A close examination of a particular aspect of Graeco-Roman society with special attention to the ways in which the lives of ancient Greeks and Romans were different from those in the modern world. Each time it is offered, this course covers a different social topic, including the ancient family, athletics, education, political organization and theory, military life, utopias, etc. May be repeated for credit with different topics.

In this WOST cross-listed section, we’ll examine the many roles of women in Greek and Roman traditions. These traditions provide an all-but-exclusively male perspective on gender relations. We’ll investigate the nature and social implications of the relationship between Greco-Roman men and women by reading ancient literary texts and modern socio-archaeological studies. We’ll also read and react to some modern scholarly interpretations of our texts. (Listed also as HIST 240G.) (Three credits.) (Dobson)

SPAN 326. Topics in Spanish: Women's Literature. A close study of a selected topic related to the Spanish language or literature. Previous topics have included Business Spanish, Focus on the Caribbean, Mexican Literature, Hispanic Drama, The Picaresque Novel. Prerequisite: SPAN 310 or consent of the instructor. (Three credits.) (Mato)

Fall 2007

WOST 201G. Introduction to Women’s Studies. An introduction to Western feminist thought and the study of women’s roles and status in society. This course also evaluates present knowledge about women, questions stereotypes, and reinforces the value and content of women’s everyday lives. (Three credits.) (Kauffmann)

ARTD 306G. Women, Art, and Feminism. A general introduction to the special position of women in art from the earliest documented record through contemporary eras by illustrating women’s artistic production, and by critically examining the view of women in visual arts. Eras are examined in their cultural context to gain a complete understanding of how women’s art production reflects the particular time and place in which it is produced. (Offered alternate years in fall semester; 2007-2008, 2009-2010.) (Three credits.) (Meeker)

CATA 231. Interpersonal Communication. An examination of the verbal and nonverbal features of face-to-face communication in everyday life, social interaction, professional activity, and in our culture as a whole. Attention is given to language as a cultural system and as a meaning system, communication as behavior, relationship development, and communication systems and effects. Emphasis is placed on understanding theory, systematically observing communicative behavior, analysis of communication situations, and skill improvement. Offered each year. Prerequisite: COMM 101. (Three credits.) (Peterson)

ENGL 350. Victorian Culture.  This course will explore a variety of issues relevant to the Victorian period including industrialization, science, religion, "the woman question," sexuality, medievalism, politics, and empire by examining a number of literary and cultural "texts" including classic literature, popular literature, children’s literature, paintings, music, theatre, magazines, and food (yes, food). Authors/artists may include Tennyson, Browning, Eliot, Doyle, Hunt, Kipling, Bronte, Braddon, Dickens, Rossetti, Doyle, Gilbert & Sullivan, and Meredith (among others). Of particular interest to women's studies minors will be the many women writers whose works we will read (Bronte, Braddon, Rossetti, and others) and the exploration of representations of women in the arts during the period. (Three credits.) (Hale)

FREN 250. Special Topics: Women's Literature. May be repeated for credit. (Three credits.) (Brady)

HIST 105. History Through Movies: Gender and Comedy. This one-hour course explores how a particular theme or issue that has been represented in popular mainstream movies. The course will meet one evening a week for ten weeks for a short lecture on the movie, to view the movie, and to discuss it. The course may be repeated once, when the topic is changed. (One credit.) (Cordery)

HIST 370. Women in United States History. A survey of women’s historical experiences in the United States from the American Revolution to the present, this course will examine the methodology of women’s history, demonstrating its similarities with and important divergences from traditional approaches to the past. The course will examine women’s history as both an integral part of United States history and as a unique subject of historical investigation. Prerequisite: Either HIST 111 or HIST 112, or permission of the instructor. (Three credits.) (Cordery)

PHIL 225. Philosophy and Feminism. This course will offer an introduction to some of the questions that shape feminist philosophy today. What connections are there between feminist philosophy and feminist writing in other disciplines and feminist movements inside and outside the academy? The class will assume the importance of diverse women’s voices. Reading theoretical, literary, and experimental texts which challenge the distinction between theory and literature, the class will focus on how an awareness of the intersections of race, class, sexuality, gender, ability, and ethnicity is vital for disciplinary and interdisciplinary study in feminist philosophy. (Three credits.) (Mamary)

SOCI 343. Sociology of Development. A comparative/historical analysis of conditions in the post-colonial developing world. Topics include the major theories of development, inequality between nations, and the social consequences of various development strategies and policies. (Three credits.) (Kessler)

 

 

 

 

  home - the minor - the faculty - contact

dot
dot
dot Monmouth College Marlo M. Belschner Copyright © 2006-2007 - All Rights Reserved