Dr. Stacy A. Cordery
Monmouth College

How to do a bibliography

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A bibliography is a convenient list of all of the sources that you have cited in your research paper.  If you have not cited them (that is, if they don't appear in an endnote or a footnote) then you cannot place the source in your bibliography.  Some professors will allow you to hand in a "Works Consulted" page along with your "Works Cited" page (another name for a bibliography is a Works Cited page).   Always check to make sure that every source you cite in your footnotes or endnotes appears in your bibliography, and also check that everything in your bibliography appears in your footnotes or endnotes.
 

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Some professors will want you to separate your bibliography into two sections:  Primary Sources and Secondary Sources.  The examples below fit either way of creating a bibliography.
 

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You can either double space between the entries on your bibliography, or you can indent the second line, for ease of reading.

IMPORTANT NOTE:  ENCYCLOPEDIAS, TEXTBOOKS, AND DICTIONARIES ARE NOT APPROPRIATE SOURCES FOR COLLEGE PAPERS.  DO NOT USE THEM.

BOOK WITH ONE AUTHOR:
 
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Jeffries, Judson L.  Huey P. Newton:  The Radical Theorist.  Jackson:  University Press of Mississippi, 2002.

BOOK WITH TWO AUTHORS:

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Evans, Rowland, and Robert Novak.  Lyndon B. Johnson:  The Exercise of Power.  New York: Harper & Row, 1988.

EDITED BOOK:

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Herring, George C., ed.  The Pentagon Papers.  New York:  McGraw Hill, 1993.

EDITED BOOK WITH MULTIPLE AUTHORS:

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Alpern, Sara, Joyce Antler, Elisabeth Israels Perry, and Ingrid Winther Scobie, eds.  The Challenge of Feminist Biography:  Writing the Lives of Modern American Women.  Urbana:  University of Illinois Press, 1992.

ARTICLE:

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Adler, Julius Ochs.  "Horrors in Japanese Prisons Like Those of Nazi Camps."  New York Times.  30 August 1944: 1-2.
 

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Pestana, Carla Gardina.  "The Quaker Executions as Myth and History."  Journal of American History.  80:2.  September, 1993:  441-469.
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Note:  if there is no author, either write:  N.A.  "Title." Journal Title.  Date: page. or else leave it blank and start with the article title.

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Further note:  if there are multiple authors, cite them just like the multiple authors for books, above.

WEBSITE:

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Monroe, R.D.  "Debating Douglas on the National Stage, 1857-1858."  Lincoln/Net:  Lincoln Digitalization Project.  <http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/biography7.html>.

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"Big Orange:  California Citrus Label Art."  California Historical Society Website.  <ttp://www.californiahistoricalsociety.org/exhibits/past_ex_big_orange.html>.
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Note:  Try to find the author of the on-line article you are citing.  If no author, then start with the title of the article.  Always include the name of the website (in the above examples, Lincoln/Net and California Historical Society Website.

INTERVIEW:
 
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Clinton, Hillary Rodham.  Interview by author.  22 May 2015.

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Musial, Stan.  Interview by Thomas Clark.  5 January 1960.  Transcript in the Baseball Hall of Fame, Cooperstown, New York.

ARCHIVAL DOCUMENT:
 
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Minutes of the Board of Directors, Great Northern Railway.  17 June 1845.  Public Record Office.  London, England.